How to

Plant power: how to create an indoor garden

Spring’s arrival greets us with pretty blooms, plenty of greenery, and the fresh scent of nature in the air. And while we may be missing out on our usual spring cues as we stay indoors this year, that doesn’t mean we have to miss out on the benefits of greenery completely. Adding plants and flowers to your home is a great way to bring the outside in, recreating the benefits of nature’s finest in a way we can enjoy from our sofa. So we’ve put together this handy how-to guide for anyone looking to harness plant power this spring and create an indoor garden they can enjoy safely from home – especially if you don’t have a garden or balcony space.

The benefits of house plants

One of the most talked-about benefits of house plants is their ability to purify the air – taking in carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. But house plants have lots of other benefits too. Studies have shown that adding house plants to your home can help reduce stress, increase productivity and boost your mood – great benefits year-round, but especially when we’re feeling frustrated about having to stay inside. House plants have even been said to keep dust at bay too – the gift that keeps giving.

Best house plants for low light

Keeping house plants alive doesn’t have to be hard. But when it comes to creating an indoor garden at home, it’s important to research which plants you pick so that they suit your environment – and have a better chance of survival. One of the biggest struggles when it comes to house plant maintenance is light levels –  especially in smaller apartments, which tend to be darker. But the good news is, you can still have a flourishing indoor garden, and many of the trending house plants of 2020 thrive in low light: snake plants, spider plants, lucky bamboo, and ponytail palms. Keep them in a room that gets at least a few hours of daylight and you’ll be on your way to happy plant parenthood.

Low maintenance house plants

Plants need sunlight, water, and occasional feeding – so, in terms of house guests, they’re naturally low maintenance. But if you’re prone to forgetting to get out your watering can, air plants only need to be dipped in water from time to time – and it’s less messy, as there’s no soil required. Monsteras and succulents are similarly drought tolerant, although both require soil to thrive. And other low maintenance, hardy house plants include spider plants and the low light plants listed above.

 

How to style house plants and create an indoor garden

There are two approaches when it comes to styling house plants – clustered or spread out. If you prefer a more subtle look for your indoor garden, place different shapes and different size pots in each room. Mix up their height so that there’s something to look at every level – it’s more interesting and less contrived. Or for a more dramatic effect, arrange all your house plants in a focal point of your chosen space – like your living room or bedroom – and ideally by a light source. Shelves, bar carts, or ladder units make unusual plant display units. Combine different textures of the plant pot, from ceramic to terracotta and metal, and make sure the colours are cohesive – either deliberately contrasting or tonal in their palette. Choose plants of different heights and leaf types for maximum indoor garden impact. And don’t forget to add a design-led statement watering can to your display.

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